Home Search Index A-Z Contact Us Portal
News About Us Academics Student Life Library Research Athletics
University of Louisiana at Lafayette College of Liberal Arts
     
Prospective Students
Current Students
Alumni, Donors & Friends
Visitors
Faculty & Staff
college home | staff | academics | students | scholarships | departments | news
 
English Program Information
 
 
PROGRAM OF STUDY
 
Study in the field of English offers a general humanistic education as well as skills in communiction and analysis that are essential in most careers. An education in English enables students to read closely and critically, to think analytically, to write and communicate, to weigh values, and to understand people and cultures.
 
CURRICULUM DESCRIPTION
 
The English curriculum at UL Lafayette offers a large number of courses in English, representing the areas of literature, creative writing, folklore, linquistics, rhetoric, and technical writing). In order to obtain this degree, students must take 36 hours in English and must also earn an 18 hour "minor" in another field that is in some way related to English or the student's career interests. The curriculum also requires courses in such areas as history, math, biological and physical science, communication, the arts, behavioral science, modern language, computer science and philosophy.

English Major, No Specified Concentration

The English Major offers students a general humanistic education as well as skills in communication and analysis that are essential in most careers. A broad education in English enables students to read closely and critically, to think analytically, to write and communicate, to weigh values, and to understand people and cultures. Students who do not specify a concentration will have the most leeway in their curriculum. If you prefer to have more focus and direction, you may specify a concentration.

English Major, Creative Writing Concentration

The concentration in creative writing allows English majors to focus on developing ther own creative voice and work. As they do this, they will develop an appreciation of the ways in which producing literary writing relates to literary scholarship in general. Students can explore a range of forms from fiction to screen-writing to creative nonfiction, or they can choose to concentrate on one form in particular, perhaps poetry or drama. Either way, students in the creative writing concentration will encounter a range of writing styles, while exploring both expressive and innovative uses of language. In company with other writers and artists and faculty mentors, creative writing concentrators will take the groundwork of the English major and create their own new work.

Whether you want to try traditional forms, avant garde language experiments, or compose our own fantasy novel adventure, the creative writing concentration will provide you the skills and mentoring to make your inspirations come to life on the page. Last but not least, the undergraduate creative writing club, Writers Bloc, is an important part of our program, designed with undergraduate writers in mind. The club offers workshops, readings, social gatherings, and more, affording creative writing students a community of writing peers with whom to continue developing their writing.

English Major, Folklore Concentration

Students often find that a concentration in folklore studies, with its emphasis on discovering and understanding human culture, useful in careers in the law, politics, and the sciences. With its emphasis on openness to a variety of human experience and expression and the careful collection and analysis of those experiences and expressions, folklore studies is also often pursued as a minor for students majoring in pre-law, pre-med, biology, and anthropology. Both the major and the minor concentration are useful to students interested in pursuing careers in the arts and culture industries as well as public sector work.

English Major, Linguistics Concentration

The linguistics concentration encourages students to think about language and linguistic behavior of all kinds. Traditional literature courses, and indeed many of a student's college courses, deal with issues in natural language but do not focus on them. From phonetics to grammar to meaning, studying linguistics develops skills for recognizing and analyzing problems that arise from how natural languages function and how they are deployed. This concentration will also prepare students to enter graduate school in a variety of specialties.

Linguistics is valuable training for mny different professions: the computer industry (developing search engines, speech recognition, and artificial intelligence); education (training teachers, teaching English as a Second language; teaching English overseas; even training actors in pronunciation and intonation); speech therapy; translators and interpreters; the publishing industry (technical writers and journalists); testing agencies (preparation and evaluation of standardized exams); lexicography (developing dictionaries); and government or law (working for the Foreign Service, FBI, CIA, law enforcement, and legal firms on matters such as linguistic evidence, voice identification and the language of legal tests).

English Major, Literature Concentration

The literature concentration is designed to provide students with a broad background in British and American literature and culture, as well as with the skills to interpret and write about texts and contexts. Many employers value the literature student's preparation in reading and interpreting language perceptively, writing clearly, researching, and critical thinking. Work in literary studies helps to prepare students to succeed in a wide variety of fields: academics (including graduate school), teaching in public and private schools, advertising, government service, journalism, pubishing, film, law, medicine. and business. Because literary texts focus, from every more diverse points of view, on the lives of our fellow humans, specialists in literature are well-equipped to read and interpret human life and all that it encompasses.

English Major, Professional Writing Concentration

In todays job market, graduates with a concentration in professional writing are in high demand by employers in business, industry, marketing, government, and publishing. Valuable skills such as writing, editing, web design, and desktop publishing equip students for careers related to the production of both print andd digital media. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the number of positions for technical writers and editors will increase by 18% in the next 10 years, with an average annual salary for technical writers of $66,240. In addition to its diverse and practical curriculum, UL's professional writing concentration incudes an internship, which allows students to work in their field of choice and develop their professional portfolios, in preparation for their careers.
 
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
 
A complete listing of course requirements is available in PDF.
(open PDF in free Adobe Reader to view or print course requirements)
 
English
 
English/Creative Writing
 
English/Folklore
 
English/Linguistics
 
English/Literature
 
English/Professional Writing
 
COURSE OFFERINGS
 
90.  Basic Writing. (4, 0, 4). Preparation for academic writing development of effective writing strategies as well as reading comprehension skills. For freshmen with scores of 17 and below in English on the ACT.

101.  Introduction to Academic Writing. (3, 0, 3). Designed to introduce students to the critical thinking, reading, and writing skills required in the university and beyond.  Course will focus on writing effective, well-argued essays.  Prereq:  a grade of “C” or better in ENGL 90 or a minimum score of 18 on the ACT.

102.  Writing and Research About Culture. (3, 0, 3).
Through exploration of cultural themes, students will build on and advance the thinking, reading, and writing skills learned in English 101 while focusing on rhetoric and research.  Topics vary.  Satisfies diversity and international requirements.  Prereq:  A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 101.

115.  Honors Academic Writing. (3, 0, 3)
. Critical reading and research-based writing on literature and culture. Satisfies diversity and international requirements. Credit in 115 completees freshman English requirements. Prereq: Advanced placement or a minimum score of 28 on the ACT in English.

201.  British Literature I. (3, 0, 3).
A survey of British literature from its beginnings through the eighteenth century, emphasizing the critical reading of individual works. Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115, or advanced placement.

202.  British Literature II. (3, 0, 3).
A survey of British literature from the eighteenth century to the present, emphasizing the critical reading of individual works. Prereq:  “C” or better  in ENGL 102,  ESOL 102, ENGL 115, or advanced placement.

205.  American Literature I. (3, 0, 3). A survey of American literature from its beginnings to Walt Whitman, emphasizing the critical reading of representative works. Prereq:  “C” or  better in ENGL 102,  ESOL 102, ENGL 115, or advanced placement.

206.  American Literature II. (3, 0, 3).
A survey of American literature from Walt Whitman to the present, emphasizing the critical reading of representative works. Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 102,  ESOL 102, ENGL 115, or advanced placement.

210. Literary Genres. (3,0,3). Content varies. Explores and traces the development of a specified genre or subgenre of literature. May be repeated for credit when the genre changes. Prereq: Six hours freshman English credit.

211. Thematic Approaches to Literature. (3,0,3). Content varies. Each section focuses on a different theme. Explores and traces the development of a specified theme that recurs in literature through the ages. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prereq: Six hours freshman English credit.

212. Literature and Other Media. (3,0,3). Content varies. Explores the relationship of literature to other arts. Prereq: Six hours freshman English credit.

215.  Honors British Literature. (3, 0, 3). A course for superior students, focusing on the major writers in British literature from the beginnings to the present. Prereq:   “C” or better in ENGL 115, advanced placement, or recommendation by ENGL 102 instructor.

216.  Honors American Literature. (3, 0, 3)
. A course for superior students, focusing on the major writers in American literature from the beginnings to the present. Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 115, advanced placement, or recommendation by ENGL 102 instructor.

223.  Introduction to Creative Writing. (3, 0, 3).
An introduction to the forms and concepts of literary creation.  The basic elements and compositional principles of fiction, poetry, drama are all treated. Prereq:  Six hours freshman English credit or JOUR 201.

275. Film as Art and Entertainment. (3, 0, 3).
Structure, vocabulary, and genres of film. Prereq: 6 hours of Freshman English credit.

290. Introduction to Literary Studies. (3, 0, 3). Principal genres, theories, and terms. Writing intensive with focus on integrating basics of literary research and analysis of prose, poetry, drama and film. Prereq: "C" or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115, or advanced placement. Restr: English and English education majors.

293.  Writing Center Tutoring. (1, 2, 2).
A course designed to train students in effective tutoring techniques in writing center situations. Prereq: ENGL 102, 115, or admission to the University Honors Program.

304.  Vocabulary Development. (3, 0, 3). A thorough analysis of word building, involving a complete examination of English morphology and etymology, stressing Greek, Latin, and native affixes. Designed for general vocabulary enrichment. Prereq: Six hours freshman English credit.

305.  Bibliographic Research. (1, 1, 1).
An advanced course designed to provide practice in the use of specialized bibliographies, periodical indices, microforms, and U. S. government publications. Prereq: Six hours freshman English credit.

312.  Shakespeare. (3, 0, 3).
Representative plays with emphasis on interpretive reading. Not recommended for Liberal Arts English majors. Prereq: Three hours sophomore English credit.

319.  Modern Poetry. (3, 0, 3). 
Content varies.  Studies in twentieth and twenty-first century poetry from diverse cultures and nationalities.  Prereq:  “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115; or advanced placement.

320.  Modern Fiction. (3, 0, 3).
Content varies.  Studies in diversity of twentieth and twenty-first century fiction in English and in translation.  Prereq:  “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement.

321.  Survey of World Literature I. (3, 0, 3).
Masterpieces of ancient, medieval, and Renaissance European literature, in translation. Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement.

322.  Survey of World Literature II. (3, 0, 3).
Masterpieces of European literature from the neoclassic age to the modern period, in translation. Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement.

325.  Creative Writing-Fiction. (3, 0, 3).
The development of skills in fiction composition with emphasis on traditional uses of plot, characterization, etc.; critical analysis of student works. Prereq: ENGL 223 and/or permission of the instructor.

326.  Creative Writing-Poetry. (3, 0, 3).
The development of skills in poetry composition with  emphasis on traditional forms and patterns as well as contemporary trends; critical analysis of student works.  Prereq: ENGL 223  and/or permission of the instructor.

327.  Creative Writing-Drama. (3, 0, 3).
 A study of the techniques of writing for the stage and/or screen, with critical analysis of student works.  Prereq:  Six hours of freshman English credit and permission of the instructor.

332.  Introduction to Folklore. (3, 0, 3).
  An introduction to the concepts of folklore as well as traditional oral, social, customary, and material forms.  Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement.

333.  Louisiana Literature. (3, 0, 3).
 A survey of writings by Louisiana authors or about Louisiana, especially from the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.  Prereq:  “C” or better in ENGL 102,  ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement. 

335.  Louisiana Folklore. (3, 0, 3).
  A critical examination of the folklore found in the different ethnic, regional, and occupational cultures of Louisiana.  Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement.

341.  History of Drama. (3, 0, 3).
Studies in major developments in Western drama by a reading of representative plays from the Greek period to the mid-nineteenth century. Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement.

342.  Modern Drama. (3, 0, 3).
Studies in Western drama from the mid-nineteenth century to the present through a reading of plays representative of the major types. Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement.

351.  Introduction to Linguistics. (3, 0, 3)
. An introduction to the scientific investigation of language, including the basics of phonology, syntax, semantics, dialects, and language learning.  Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement.

352.  English Grammar and Usage. (3, 0, 3). 
Mechanics and terminology of English grammar including parts of speech, voice, grammatical roles, and basic sentence patterns, with attention paid to usage and other writing conventions such as style and punctuation.  Prereq:  ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115, or advanced placement, with a minimum grade of “C”.

353.  Advanced English Grammar. (3, 0, 3). 
An Exploration of the grammatical structure of English that builds on the foundational concepts taught in ENGL 352.  Prereq:  Six hours of freshman English and ENGL 352 or permission of instructor. 

355.  Advanced Writing for Teachers. (3, 0, 3).
Contents may vary by section. Study and practice of composition, rhetoric, and critical thinking through the use of the writing prrocess. For students who plan to teach at the secondary school level. Prereq: Six hours sophomore English credit.

360.  Advanced Writing. (3, 0, 3)
. Advanced course on variable topics in the practice of academic writing, with a focus on rhetorical awareness, research methods, and critical thinking. Prereq: Six hours freshman English credit.

365.  Technical Writing. (3, 0, 3).
A course in technical communication with an emphasis on practical documents.  Recommended for students in technical majors and for students considering careers in technical/professional writing. Prereq:  Six hours of freshman English credit. Pre or Coreq: Fifteen hours credit in the student's major field.

370.  Special Topics in Literary and/or Media Art. (3, 0, 3).
An examination of one issue, theme, and/or genre in literature and/or media. Variable content.  May be repeated for credit.

371. Introduction to Ethnic Literatures. (3, 0, 3).
Variable content.  May be repeated for credit.  African American, Native American, US Latino, Asian American, Jewish, etc.  Prereq:  “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115, or advanced placement.

372.  Special Topics in Literature of Popular Culture. (3, 0, 3).
Variable content; e.g. detective, science fiction, frontier.  May be repeated for credit.  Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement.

375.  Film Studies: Terms and History. (3, 0, 3).
  Technology, history, and cultural significance of film. Prereq: ENGL 275 or permission of instructor required.  

380.  Readings in Literature by Women. (3, 0, 3).
Significant texts by major women writers, mainly 19th and 20th century English and American, but not restricted to these; readings will cover a variety of literary genres--the novel, short fiction, poetry.  Prereq: “C” or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement.

381.  The Scripture as Literature. (3, 0, 3).
A study of literary themes and techniques in selected works of scripture.  Prereq: C or better in ENGL 102, ESOL 102, ENGL 115 or advanced placement.

General Prerequisite for all 400 level courses: UPPER-DIVISION STANDING, AT LEAST 60 HOURS OF CREDIT TOWARD A DEGREE, AND 6 HOURS SOPHOMORE ENGLISH CREDIT.

402(G).  Survey of Old English Literature. (3, 0, 3). Major prose and poetic works in translation, from the beginnings to 1100.

403(G).  English Novel I. (3, 0, 3). The development of the novel from the beginnings through Jane Austen. Critical reading of selected works.

404(G).  English Novel II. (3, 0, 3)
. The development of the novel from 1820 to WWI. Critical reading of selected works.

405(G).  History of the English Language. (3, 0, 3)
. Precursors of Old English to modern period.

406(G).  Survey of Restoration and Eighteenth Century Bristish Literature.   (3, 0, 3).
  The evolution of English prose, drama, and poetry. 

408(G).  Advanced Creative Writing Workshop. (3, 0, 3).  May be repeated for credit.  Theory and practice of writing for publication; critical examination of student works.  Content varies:  poetry or drama.  Prereq:  Permission of instructor and ENGL 326 or 327. 

409(G).  Form in Creative Writing. (3, 0, 3). 
May be repeated for credit.  Content varies.  Topics explore the theory of creative expression in poetry, drama, fiction, non-fiction, mixed-genre, or other verbal art.  Open to non-creative writing students.

411(G).  English Literature of the Sixteenth Century. (3, 0, 3). Non-dramatic literature of the English Renaissance from 1500 to 1600.

412(G).  Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. (3, 0, 3)
. Non-Shakespearean drama of the English Renaissance, to the closing of the public playhouses in 1642.

413(G).  Chaucer. (3, 0, 3).
  Chaucer's major works, especially The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, with some attention to reading in Middle English.

414(G).  Milton. (3, 0, 3).
Exploration of Milton's thought and art, including a reading of the important minor poems, selected prose, and all of Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes.

415(G).  Major Writers in Restoration and Eighteenth Century British Literature.   (3, 0, 3).  Variable content. Literary works of important British poets, playwright, and prose writers.  May be repeated for credit. 

416(G).  Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature and Culture.  (3, 0, 3). 
Content varies.  Selected poems, plays, and prose works of the period studied in the context of non-literary culture (arts, politics, colonialism, economics, institutions, manners, etc.).  May be repeated for credit.

417(G).  Survey of Medieval English Literature. (3, 0, 3). An examination of the major genres and themes in English literature from 1100 to 1500, exclusive of Chaucer.

420(G).  Issues in Nineteenth Century Literature.  (3, 0, 3). 
Variable content.  An examination of various issues, themes, and/or genres in British literature nineteenth century.  May be repeated for credit.

423(G).  Shakespeare: The Early Plays. (3, 0, 3). A critical reading of the dramatic works of Shakespeare to about 1600. ENGL 423 and 424 recommended for English majors in lieu of ENGL 312.

424(G).  Shakespeare: The Later Plays. (3, 0, 3).
A critical reading of the later dramatic works of Shakespeare with emphasis on the tragedies.

425(G).  Semantics. (3, 0, 3)
. Examines how meaning is expressed in language. 

426(G).  English Literature of the Seventeenth Century. (3, 0, 3).
A survey of the non-dramatic literature of the English Renaissance from 1600 to the Restoration.

427(G).  The British Romantic Era. (3, 0, 3). 
A survey of the literature of the Romantic Era in Britain.  Readings in poetry, prose, fiction, and drama in relation to the historical, political and cultural issues of the day. 

428(G).  The Victorian Era. (3, 0, 3). 
A survey of literature of the Victorian Era in Britain; readings in poetry, prose, fiction, and drama in relation to the historical, political and cultural issues of the day. 

429(G). American Renaissance. (3, 0, 3).
 Studies in the rise of a distinctively American literature and aesthetic, with emphasis on the period between 1835 and 1865. 

430(G).  Southern Literature. (3, 0, 3). From colonial times to the present. Emphasis on intellectual trends and literary groups peculiar to the South.

432(G).  American Folklore. (3, 0, 3)
. Includes field work.

433(G). Approaches to African American Literature.  (3, 0, 3).
Critical approaches to various topics, e.g., the Harlem Renaissance, Black feminism, Black Arts Aesthetics.  Includes works in various genres (poetry, fiction, drama, theory, etc.).

435(G). American Realism and Naturalism. (3, 0, 3).  Theory and practice of American literary realism and naturalism in the U.S., especially between the Civil War and World War I. 

437(G).  Early American Literature. (3, 0, 3)
. A survey of American literature from its beginnings to the American Renaissance, with an emphasis on major figures and intellectual and cultural movements.

440(G).  Folklore and Literature. (3, 0, 3)
.  Interrelationships between folklore and written literature.

441(G).  Restoration and Eighteenth Century Drama. (3, 0, 3)
. Survey of major English playwrights from 1660 to 1780. Attention to Etherege, Wycherley, Dryden, Congreve, Lillo, Fielding, Gay, Goldsmith, and Sheridan.

442(G).  Modern American Drama. (3, 0, 3)
. Survey of American theater in the 20th and 21st centuries.

443(G).  Issues in Modern Poetry. (3, 0, 3). 
Content varies.  May be repeated for credit.  Exploration of various issues and themes in the poetry of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  

444(G).  Movements in Modern Poetry. (3, 0, 3).  Content varies.  May be repeated for credit.  Various movements and schools of poetry in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  Sp, even-numbered years.

445(G).  Modern American Fiction. (3, 0, 3). 
Content varies.  May be repeated for credit.  Explores fiction composed in the Americas of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. 

446(G).  Fiction Workshop. (3, 0, 3).
  Theory and practice of writing for publication; critical examination of student works.  For advanced students of demonstrated ability.  Prereq:  20-30 pp. fiction manuscript submitted by July 1. Restr: Permission of instructor required.

449(G).  Louisiana Folklore Fieldwork. (2, 6, 3).
This course will consist of intensive fieldwork in a designated area of folklore. Classes will meet once a week for lectures and archiving, twice a week in the field. Students wishing to work in French should substitute French 449G. Prereq:  FREN 340, ENGL 332, 432, or permission of the instructor.

450(G).  History of Children's Literature. (3, 0, 3).
A critical analysis of historically significant children's literature, primarily British and American, from its beginnings in the eighteenth century to the present.

452(G).  Language, Culture and Society. (3, 0, 3).
  Dialect variations in languages due to race, social group, sex, region, etc., as well as the predominant attitudes associated with such variety and the social, economic, political and educational implications of these attitudes.

455(G).
  Topics in Linguistics  (3, 0, 3).  Content varies.  May be repeated for credit twice.

456(G).  Approaches to Literature. (3, 0, 3)
. A survey of critical approaches to poetry, fiction and drama, including the formalistic, psychological, mythological and archetypal approaches, as well as traditional approaches. Designed primarily for English Education majors and secondary school teachers.

457(G).  Classical Rhetoric. (3, 0, 3). A survey of the theories and pedagogies of classical rhetoric in ancient Greece and Rome and their influences on modern theories and practices.

458(G).  Investigating Text and Talk. (3, 0, 3).
  Application of linguistic principles to analysis of texts and verbal interaction. 

459(G).  Literary Theory and Practical Criticisms. (3, 0, 3)
. Examination of major theoretical stances toward literature and associated problems; analysis of literary texts in accordance with such stances.

460(G).  Themes and Issues in Children's Literature. (3, 0, 3)
. A critical examination of themes and issues in children's literature, primarily British and American.

462(G).  Special Projects in Technical Writing. (3, 0, 3).
May be repeated for credit up to 9 hours.  Prereq:  ENGL 365.  Restr:  Permission of instructor required.

463(G).  Technical Writing Practicum. (3, 0, 3). 
May be repeated for credit up to 9 hours.  Industry, agency, or university internship.  Prereq:  ENGL 365 or equivalent experience.  Restr:  Permission of instructor required.

464(G).  Special Topics in Rhetoric and Composition. (3, 0, 3). 
May be repeated for credit.  Content varies, e.g., criticism, pedagogy, technical and professional writing, rhetorical history.

466(G).  Modern Irish Literature and Culture. (3, 0, 3). 
Content varies.  Studies in Irish literature produced mainly in the twentieth century.  Attention to the social, cultural, and historical milieu within which the work was produced. 

467(G).  Modern British Literature and Culture.  (3, 0, 3). 
Survey of British literature written mainly in the twentieth century in multiple genres. 

470(G).  Genres in Children's Literature. (3, 0, 3)
. Content varies. May be repeated for credit. A critical study of various genres in children's literature, primarily British and American.

475(G).  Rhetoric of Film. (3, 0, 3).
Study of filmic communication, including introduction to representative critics and critical systems; based on viewing of selected films.

476(G).  Non-Fiction Workshop. (3, 0, 3). 
Theory and practice of writing literary non-fiction for publication in such areas as travel and nature writing, cultural analysis, and literary journalism.  Critical examination of models of noted prose writers from Thucydides to Annie Dillard.

482(G).  Folklore Genres. (3, 0, 3).
  A survey of the forms of folklore and the techniques, tools, and skills used to study them. 

484(G).  Feminist Literary Criticism. (3, 0, 3). 
Survey of the history of and current developments in the field in relation to major theoretical movements, including psychoanalysis, postmodernism, deconstruction, Marxism.

496(G).  Major Literary Figures. (3, 0, 3). A course of variable content focusing on the work of not more than three major literary figures. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.

497(G)-498(G).  Special Projects I, II. (3 ea.).
Individual research or writing projects in fields students wish to study intensively.

499(G).  Special Topics in English. (1-6).
Offered by special arrangement with the department head.  Topics may vary each time the course is taught.  May be repeated for credit.  Prereq: Permission of the instructor.
 
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
 
Learn about potential career paths and prospective employers.
 
FURTHER INFORMATION
 
Department of English
University of Louisiana at Lafayette
P. O. Box 44691
Lafayette, LA 70504-4691

Office located in H.L. Griffin Hall, Room 221
Phone: (337) 482-6906
Fax: (337) 482-5071
Email: english@louisiana.edu

Web Site: http://english.louisiana.edu/
 

Document last revised Monday, June 10, 2013 9:41 AM

Copyright 2003 by the University of Louisiana at Lafayette
College of Liberal Arts, P.O. Box 40397, Lafayette LA 70504
Martin Hall, Room 246 · 337/482-6219 · doburt@louisiana.edu